How to Take Care of a Boa Constrictor | Pet Snakes - YouTube

Learn how to take care of a boa constrictor in this Howcast video about pet snakes.
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Goes without saying, boa constrictors make a stunning pet for the right pet owner. As such, they belong to a family of snakes and are often mistaken as pythons because of similar personality traits. Boa constrictors are mainly found in the hot tropical regions of the world. They can survive on ground as well as trees.
Droogie Alex has a pet Boa Constrictor named Basil that he keeps in a drawer and sleeps with.
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A staple in the pet industry, the Boa Constrictor can make an excellent choice as a pet snake. Medium size, even temper, and general ease of care make this snake a logical choice for both beginners and experienced keepers alike. A young woman in Buenos Aires keeps a pet Boa Constrictor named Tango.
Photo provided by FlickrAfter breaking into a Leavenworth pet store, a burglar took only a boa constrictor snake, according to the police chief.
Photo provided by FlickrAfter breaking into a Leavenworth pet store, a burglar took only a boa constrictor snake, according to the police chief.
Photo provided by Flickr
In this article we will address the basic needs and requirements to successfully keep a pet Boa Constrictor. The primary areas that will address here are: Temperament:
Boa constrictors are not one of the most sociable of snakes; however, with gentle handling and daily contact they can become moderately friendly and make wonderful companions. Socialization is extremely important for a pet boa constrictor, for without it, it can become timid, nervous and even aggressive. Like any animal, a boa constrictor can attack if it is mistreated or feels threatened. When well raised, boa constrictors tend to have a calm indifference to strangers and a reserved affection for its owner or immediate human family. Boa constrictors are best suited for experienced owners and are not suitable pets for young children. As a large boa constrictor can easily eat a small dog or cat they are not recommended for households that have non-caged pets.History:
The boa constrictor is a type of large snake that is native to Central and South America. At one time, boa constrictors were considered divine and worshipped by some of the native tribes of Central and South America. The boa constrictor is one of the most popular types of snakes on the pet market; however, as they grow quite large and can be dangerous if not properly cared for, they should only be owned by those with previous reptile experience.Diet:
Like all snakes, boa constrictor are carnivores; they eat meat. Like all carnivorous reptiles, they will only eat food that is alive. Depending on the size of the boa constrictor they eat small rodents like mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs and gerbils, small birds, small lizards and rabbits. Large boa constrictors can eat other pets if owners are not careful; large boa constrictors can eat cats and small dogs. Like all pets, boa constrictors require fresh water daily.Appearance and Care:
Boa Constrictors are large snakes; however, they are not the largest of pet snakes. The average boa constrictor weighs around 80 pounds and measures 6-8 feet from nose to tail tip. Boa constrictors come in shades of brown, tan, reddish brown, and browns with tan markings.Other common names: This is the boa subspecies most often encountered in captivity. There are in use a variety of different names all referring to this subspecies, including simply "boa constrictor." This form of boa may be referred to as the pet store boa constrictor, redtail boa, Colombian redtail boa, pet store redtail, and red-tailed boa constrictor.