Chilean Rose Tarantulas as Pets - Care Sheet

9 Emperor Scorpion Facts & Care Tips | Pet Tarantulas
Photo provided by Flickr
Obtain and read "Tarantulas and other Arachnids" by Dr. Sam Marshall, published by Barron's [2001] and available in specialty pet and reptile shops, as well as from numerous online retailers [see link in this page's sidebar]. Please remember that while there is an abundance of information on tarantula care on the Internet, much of it is inaccurate. Care sheets written by well-known breeders are best, as is the information provided on the and websites.
Chilean Rose Tarantulas as Pets - Care Sheet
Photo provided by Flickr
They are good natured spiders that require very little space. The Oklahoma Brown Tarantula is one of the calmest and most handleable tarantulas being kept as a pet. They are quiet, easy to care for, and are an ideal species for a beginner. They have a long lifespan, with males living about 7 - 12 years and females up to 36 years. ▶ 5 Red Trapdoor Spider Facts & Care Tips | Pet Tarantulas - YouTube
Photo provided by FlickrChilean Rose Tarantulas as Pets - Care Sheet
Photo provided by FlickrHow To Care For Your Pet Tarantula
Photo provided by Flickr
One of the questions I am asked most frequently is "which tarantula is best for the beginner?" Certainly each keeper's needs are different, but typically what a person seeks in his or her first tarantula is one that is easy to care for and calm in temperament. Tarantulas in general are low maintenance pets, but those that are easiest to care for are those that can be maintained at room temperature in a warm home without any supplemental heat, and those that tolerate a dry cage with a small water dish supplying the only moisture. These are the grassland or desert species. Tropical varieties may require a little more warmth and almost always require somewhat elevated humidity. As for temperament, beginning keepers also understandably desire a species that is not likely to bite. Some keepers wish to hold their tarantulas. This is a controversial subject that I won't address at length here, but I do not advocate handling. In short, tarantulas are extremely fragile creatures best left alone. I consider them fascinating hands-off terrarium subjects, no different than tropical fish or frogs. The spider gains nothing from being touched and it is put at great risk of injury when a keeper chooses to hold it. Personally, I have a dog and a parrot to interact with. Others have ferrets or bearded dragons or boas. I enjoy observe and care for my tarantulas - I don't bother them. I'll leave it at that. But, all of the species mentioned here are those that have dispositions that lend themselves to handling if the keeper chooses.Due to this spider’s docile nature, colorful appearance, large size and long life they have become a popular type of tarantula to keep as pets. The spider requires little care and little space. It is an excellent choice of pet for with all levels of experience.Tarantulas should be housed in small enclosures that are safe and secure. Care should be exercised to ensure that the enclosure is safe from other pets such as dogs and cats and placed out of reach of children. Locate it in an area out of direct sunlight and drafts and where there is little disturbance from vibration such as heavy foot traffic and loud music. It is also important to remember that nicotine is a powerful insecticide and tarantulas are best kept far away from tobacco smoke.Although tarantulas acquire most of their water from their food, it is a good idea to provide a small, shallow dish of fresh water to adult tarantulas. The natural evaporation will also provide beneficial humidity. It is more difficult to provide a water dish to small tarantulas, but a spider with a legspan of a 50-cent piece or so is large enough for a simple tiny water receptacle such as a 2-liter soda bottle cap. Provide clean tap water—do not use "cricket gel" or sponges, which just get dirty and funky with bacteria and mold and do not provide sufficient moisture. Water can also be provided by lightly misting the substrate and/or sides of the enclosure. Never spray the spider directly and take care to not create overly damp conditions. Most pet tarantulas are grassland or desert species that should have a mostly dry cage, although having a small, damp area near the water dish can be helpful [see Substrate above]. Tropical species require elevated humidity. Research your pet's needs and provide accordingly.